Wearable Research – Yukie Miyazaki

Magnogrip Magnetic Wristband

Image from Magnogrip.com

Practice it works in

The magnetic wristband isn’t limited to one practice alone, and is most commonly made use of by plumbers, mechanics, auto repairmen and any other professional who often deals with small metal tools.

Specific use

The magnetic wristband is meant for holding small metal tools like screws and bolts around the wrist of the user, which is especially useful during handy activities. The sturdier and better quality ones can even hold heavier tools like small screwdrivers.

Mobility

The wristband is very mobile as it is strapped around the wrist of the user, and does not hinder the user’s movement in any way.

Utility vs Fashionability

The wearable tool is very functional, keeping all the metal bits in one place and prevents the user from misplacing them, especially since they are so small and can be easily lost. The fact that the wristband is attached to the wrist also keeps the users’ hands free and allows them to make use of both hands without having to hold on to anything. The wristband should also be quite comfortable due to the padding that is present, and is made from a nice mesh material, meaning that it wouldn’t cause the user to perspire much. However, one issue could be that the nails are exposed and can be easily knocked off should the user not be careful enough. The wristband should not be much of a fashion faux pas and can be easily passed off for a sport accessory or something similar.

Exosuit

Practice it works in

The suit is for underwater researchers.

Specific use

The suit is also dubbed a wearable submarine, allowing divers to explore deep (1000 feet) into oceans for long periods of time.

Mobility

The suit is rather mobile, with 18 joints, allowing relatively natural movement for its user. The suit is described as “a fully-certified submarine in the shape of a human”. It also comes with underwater thrusters that can help boost the user around, improving the mobility of the user in that sense.

Utility vs Fashionability

The suit allows divers deep sea exploration for longer period of time and is generally very practical as it comes with its own life support system and does not require its user to spend multiple days in a decompression chamber following the dive. The suit also allows the user to communicate with people out of water and has cameras to capture images of whatever is going on under the water that can be used for research purposes later on. It comes with claws that can help the user grab objects and cut things as well. Basically all would be nice for a diver to have underwater is now built into this suit and is made easily accessible.

Fashion-wise, it may not be the most ideal on land and would not be very useful either, with it probably being quite heavy.

Yukie Miyazaki (A0157553Y)

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